"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store

"Faith" Wool Blanket by Bethany Yellowtail

Product #: 141598

Regular price $225.00 Save $-225.00
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Only 3 items in stock!
This blanket is inspired by the Apsáalooke (Crow) name given to Designer Bethany Yellowtail as a young girl: Ammaakeealaachelibaachiilakaacheesh in English translates to “Overcomes through Faith.” This name was given to her by respected elder David Yarlott Sr. In receiving her Apsáalooke name it was her family's wishes that she always be guided, protected, and that prayer be an integral part of her life.

The blanket design "Faith" is an acknowledgment to her name, her family, the people and prayers that have guided her. The hues of pink, blue, and green are specific to the Apsáalooke homelands that she was raised on. You can view her other work in the Apsáalooke Women and Warriors exhibition.

  • Size: Queen size
  • Material: 100% New Zealand wool
  • Care: Dry clean
  • 2-sided design
  • Suede edge band
  • Designed by Bethany Yellowtail

 

About Bethany Yellowtail

Bethany Yellowtail is a fashion designer originally from the Crow (Apsáalooke) and Northern Cheyenne (Tsetsehestahese & So’taeo’o) Nations in southeastern Montana. Bethany’s artistic vision and work is irremovable from her social justice vision for her community: not only does she provide employment for dozens of artists, Bethany was active in the No-DAPL and women’s rights movements, fundraising thousands of dollars through apparel sales, teaching ribbon skirt workshops on-site at the water protector camp, and creating a silk scarf to represent the women’s march on Washington.