Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store
Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail | Field Museum Store

Dreamchaser Silk Scarf by Bethany Yellowtail

Product #: 141580

Regular price $174.99 Save $-174.99
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Bordered by a B.YELLOWTAIL geometric design, this man and woman duo ride their steeds into the night sky, shooting for the stars. The evening star guides and lights their way alongside the Big Dipper. Painted circles around the horse's eyes lend sight for them to see farther, while lightning bolts give speed for their journey. The hand print signals the victory of a "counting coup" known as a victory amongst Native peoples. This design embodies the continuing pursuit to chase your dreams.

Her work is featured in the Apsáalooke Women and Warriors exhibition.

 

  • Size: 36" W x 36" L
  • Material: 100% silk charmeuse
  • Hand rolled hem
  • Made in the U.S.A.
  • Designed by Bethany Yellowtail in collaboration with artist John Pepion

 

About Bethany Yellowtail

Bethany Yellowtail is a fashion designer originally from the Crow (Apsáalooke) & Northern Cheyenne (Tsetsehestahese & So’taeo’o) Nations in southeastern Montana. Bethany’s artistic vision and work is irremovable from her social justice vision for her community: not only does she provide employment for dozens of artists, Bethany was active in the No-DAPL and women’s rights movements, fundraising thousands of dollars through apparel sales, teaching ribbon skirt workshops on site at the water protector camp, and creating a silk scarf to represent the women’s march on Washington.